Rescue And Return Agreement 1968

Article 3 provides for the rescue of personnel from an „illuminated” spacecraft on the high seas or in another place that is not subject to the jurisdiction of a state. Thus, Article 3 would not only require the rescue of astronauts who have landed on the high seas, in accordance with Article V of the Space Treaty, but would also require rescue operations to be carried out when a landing on the Moon or other celestial bodies or on an Earth`s surface of the Earth`s surface is not subject to the jurisdiction of a state. , for example. B Antarctica. 1. Any party that receives information or finds that a space object or its components has been returned to land on its territory or on the high seas or in any other place under the jurisdiction of a State informs the opening authority and the Secretary General of the United Nations. When information is received or if it is established that the personnel of a spacecraft have arrived on the high seas or in another place under the jurisdiction of a state, the contracting parties that are able to do so renew, if necessary, the assistance to the search and rescue operations of that personnel in order to ensure their rapid rescue. They inform the launch authority and the Secretary-General of the United Nations of the steps they have taken and their progress. The UN General Assembly adopted the text of the bailout agreement on 19 December 1967 by Resolution 2345 (XXII). The convention was opened for signature on April 22, 1968 and came into force on December 3, 1968.

Since January 2019, 98 states have ratified the bailout agreement, 23 have signed and three international intergovernmental organizations (the European Space Agency, the Intersputnik International Organization of Space Communications and the European Organization for the Use of Meteorological Satellites) have declared their acceptance of the rights and obligations conferred by the agreement. [1] 3. At the request of the launch authority, objects entering space or their items found beyond the territorial boundaries of the launch authority are returned or made available to representatives of the launch authority who, upon request, transmit identification data before their return. At the time of the development of the treaty, the prospect of saving space travellers was unlikely due to limited launch opportunities, even the most advanced space programs, but has become more plausible since then. For example, Mir and later the International Space Station have entertained Russian soyuz docked spacecraft that, in an emergency, will be used as a leakage mechanism; in some scenarios, this vessel could also assist in a rescue. In the bailout agreement, only Article 5 deals with the issue of space objects that have suffered an unfortunate and unintentional accident and which, as a result, have landed, in whole or in part, somewhere on Earth. Article 5 provides only 1. Any party that receives information or finds that a space object or its constituent elements has returned to land on land or on the high seas or in any other place that is not subject to the jurisdiction of a state informs the launch authority and the Secretary General of the United Nations. 2. Each party responsible for the area in which a space object or its components were discovered, at the request of the launching instance and at the request of that authority, takes the necessary steps to recover the object or the constituent elements.

3. At the request of the launch authority, objects entering space or their items found beyond the territorial boundaries of the launch authority are returned or made available to representatives of the launch authority who, upon request, transmit identification data before their return.

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